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FAQ

(Unfortunately, this isn’t a post about Halloween, but it’s fitting, I promise!)

Over fall break, I visited a couple of friends at their school. It was so great seeing them and catching up; I loved hearing all of their college stories and sharing mine.

#socollege

Some great high school friends and I #socollege

I was curious – I wanted to know all about how classes were going, meet all their new friends, try out their dining hall food (which wasn’t exactly the highlight of my trip – I didn’t know that it was actually possible to miss FFC food). One of my friends was telling me about how at their school, it’s pretty tough to double major and that sometimes it’s even discouraged.

That was total culture shock.

Lucky for me, double majoring or adding a minor (or minors) here at Hopkins isn’t like that at all. I’m an intended Applied Mathematics and Statistics & Public Health Studies double major and life is good. Here, it’s not uncommon to find double majors – off the top of my head I know multiple Writing Seminars and Film & Media Studies, three International Studies & East Asian Studies, and a Computer Science & Applied Math! One of the best things about Hopkins is that we have no core curriculum; we are only required to fulfill certain distribution requirements in different academic areas, dependent on major. With this, you get a lot of freedom to explore different areas of interest and if you want, add another major or maybe a minor.

A lot of people double major in similar departments. Many of the major requirements have overlap, making it relatively easy to do so. You could also double major in departments that aren’t as related. (If you’re like me, you can even double major across both Whiting School of Engineering and Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, which is definitely possible). The beauty of double majoring in this way is that the major requirements for one major fulfill the distribution requirements of the other and vice versa.

Double majoring is almost always possible, as long as you plan, keep in touch with your advisors, meet upperclassmen with all the scheduling tips and tricks, and utilize your online resources.

Departmental requirements are nicely laid out here. “Gotta make my mind up, which class should I take??”

Last spring, when I was deciding where I would be attending school this fall, the ease at which students can double major and the distribution requirement system were two of the many aspects about Hopkins that led me here today. It only being my very first semester here at Hopkins, it’s hard to say with certainty that I’ll definitely be double majoring in Applied Math and Public Health (or that I’ll be majoring in either of them at all, frankly), but that’s okay. On that note, my meeting with my faculty advisor is coming up next week so it’s time for me to try and figure out my schedule for spring semester, wish me luck!