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FAQ

photo 2 (5)Name: Morgan McCarthy

Major: Global Environmental Change and Sustainability

Hometown: Cohasset, Massachusetts

Year: Class of 2016

What do you want to be when you grow up?

This is a very loaded question for me. At the end of the day I want to go to bed thankful for what I have and be excited about getting up the next morning and go back to work. Ideally I if I could get paid to travel the world that would be what I would do once I’m a grown up.

What’s something interesting you learned in class?

Learning the science behind microwaves in Organic Chemistry was something I was really excited about learning.  The professor took this magical box that had been making my popcorn for years and explained the mystery behind it. Basically the microwave is wired to target a specific wavelength that matches the wave frequency required to excite water molecules and add rotational spin to its orbits. The excitation creates heat and voila your popcorn is finished. Something I wonder about is whether dehydrated/freeze dried food wouldn’t heat up in the microwave because theoretically it should be devoid of water.

What’s a piece of advice that you would give to an incoming student?

My advice for an incoming student is take a year off and do that thing you’ve been itching to do, that “what if” statement that in your mind know is crazy and no one will understand you but you still want to fulfill it. The natural progression in my mind was that it was necessary to go straight from High School into college. Since arriving at Hopkins I have met people that taught English to Buddhist monks in China, toured South Africa with a children’s circus and yet others who explored their Jewish cultural ties in Israel. I love traveling the world and would probably have lived and worked in Europe for a year before starting college. Once your in college your opportunities to take time off from your professional and academic endeavors becomes increasingly difficult.

What’s your favorite thing about this school?

My favorite part about Hopkins is the people and friends I have met here. I came from a very homogenous “village” on the southern coast of Massachusetts but have since made friends from very different walks of life. As a result, I have been exposed to cultures I previously knew nothing of and appreciate the international community Hopkins creates. It’s a very unique experience to be able to go to an open dinner at Hillel (the Jewish center) with two Colombians, a Frenchwomen, a person with Italian roots, another with Cuban roots, someone born in Japan a of course our resident half-Dominican Jewish friend.

Why did you come to Hopkins?

The college selection process for me was more of a calculation and at the end of crunching the numbers Hopkins came out on top. I made a spreadsheet with twenty or so schools and added columns that were important to me – i.e class size, retention rate, and number of undergraduates, just to name a few. After having all the information I needed, I compressed each school into a single score and Hopkins ranked number one. I applied early decision, was admitted and toured it for the first time the day after getting in (luckily to find that it has a beautiful campus).